tomscholes:

As exercise, I’ll be sharing a drop of my inspiration folder each day for a month. The theme will remain unspoken and will be relaxed yet connected. Let me know what you think and if you’d like to suggest a topic :)

(via karkadann)


_JULIUS A/W 2011 [ h a l o; ]

_JULIUS A/W 2011 [ h a l o; ]

(Source: michaelvel, via nextworldover)

(Source: sentravii, via wiremuse)

(Source: kav-k, via wiremuse)


Galeria Adriana Varejão X

Galeria Adriana Varejão X

(via frustratedarchitects)

projecthabu:

     Launch Complex 39 at Kennedy Space Center, on Northern Merritt Island, Florida, was built in the mid-1960s, to launch the Saturn V moon rocket for peaceful exploration of space. Over the years, this complex launched every Saturn V, Saturn IB, all the Space Shuttle missions, and an Ares I rocket. Needless to say, this is the most iconic launch facility in history. The complex is split into two launch pads; 39A and 39B. Both pads launched Saturn rockets and shuttles, but the future of these pads will tell very different stories.

     The first photo in the set shows the crawlerway leading out to Launch Pad 39A. This path holds the weight of the crawler transporter as it moves the launch vehicles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the pad. The second and third photos display the pad itself, which is now owned by SpaceX. As you can see, the shuttle launch tower is still in place, but this will eventually be scrapped, and SpaceX will convert the area for use with the Falcon 9 Heavy rocket. When this vehicle launches, it will be the most powerful rocket currently flying. The fourth photo shows a Liquid Hydrogen tank, which stored propellant for the space shuttle.

     Photo number five shows Launch Pad 39B, photographed from Launch Control Center, 3.5 miles away. The sixth photo shows the pad up close. NASA removed the shuttle launch tower from this facility, and constructed three large towers, used for lightning suppression, shown up close in the seventh photo. This pad configuration allows multiple types of launch vehicles to operate here, and will allow commercial companies to rent the facility when NASA doesn’t need it. NASA’s primary use for 39B will focus around the enormous Space Launch System (SLS), which is the most powerful rocket in history, edging out the Saturn V boosters that previously launched here. 

     The SLS mobile launch platform and tower, stored next to the Vehicle Assembly Building, can be seen in in the eighth photo. Our final photo shows a shuttle mobile launch platform next to the new SLS launch platform and tower. 

patternbase:

Gaston de Latenay, Nausikaa illustration, 1899

patternbase:

Gaston de Latenay, Nausikaa illustration, 1899

(Source: 50watts.com, via tytoninae)

(Source: michinoku800, via wiremuse)

queenshulamit:

iandsharman:

It’s Loncon time!

andromedalogic I think this is the kind of design you like? (Assuming the building has good accessibility, which I can’t tell from this one picture.) I know you have gone to bed but when you wake up you will see.

queenshulamit:

iandsharman:

It’s Loncon time!

andromedalogic I think this is the kind of design you like? (Assuming the building has good accessibility, which I can’t tell from this one picture.) I know you have gone to bed but when you wake up you will see.

dresdencodak:

Warmup sketch: trying my hand at a cyborg pinup-type thing. May try another later.

dresdencodak:

Warmup sketch: trying my hand at a cyborg pinup-type thing. May try another later.

snowce:

Katsuhiro Otomo, Memories

snowce:

Katsuhiro Otomo, Memories

(Source: junxyard, via tytoninae)

(Source: kononioda, via onomatsophia)

jaymamon:

deserted planet

jaymamon:

deserted planet

(via karkadann)

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